Breaking the Glass Ceiling as a Women’s Business Enterprise

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The tech industry has changed the world for us all, but we’ve learned over the past two years that many companies with cutting edge technology still lag behind the times when it comes to women and BIPOC in leadership positions. At ComputerCare, we want to lead by example and help set things right.

On that note, we are proud to announce that under the leadership of our very own Georgia Rittenberg, ComputerCare has been officially certified as a Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE) through the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC).

The Standards

The WBENC is a leading non-profit organization dedicated to helping women-owned businesses thrive. They provide the most relied upon certification standard for women-owned businesses, as well as the tools to help them promote innovation, open doors, and create partnerships that fuel the economy.

To become a WBE, one or more women must have unrestricted control of the business, a demonstrated management of day-to-day operations, and a proportionate investment of capital or expertise. To become certified, business owners undergo a thorough vetting process, including review of business documentation and a site visit. The certification process is designed to confirm the business is at least 51% owned, controlled, operated, and managed by a woman or women. Luckily for ComputerCare, since Georgia has been our CEO for more than five years, this requirement created no obstacles to our new status. Our WBENC certification is considered the gold standard for women-owned businesses and is accepted by more than 1,000 corporations, in addition to some states, cities, and other entities.

Why This Matters

As a Women’s Business Enterprise, ComputerCare joins the ranks of nearly 13 million women-owned businesses in the United States, accounting for 42% of all U.S. businesses. This initiative is important to us, not only because it helps us increase the representation and fair treatment of women in the workforce, but also because half of the owners of these businesses are BIPOC women (AmericanExpress). When we support and represent woman-owned businesses, we also support and represent the minority entrepreneurs who lead many of these businesses.

Despite all these positives about women-owned businesses, there is still lingering bias, especially when it comes to securing funding and investors, against women entrepreneurs. This makes them both less likely to apply for business funding and, unfortunately, less likely to receive it than men (Kaufmann Foundation). Because of this, we at ComputerCare think that it’s important to take a stand as a woman-led tech company, to show our clients and competitors that we believe in the power of leadership by women and people of color.

You can also show your commitment to increased equity and representation by working with a women-owned business like ComputerCare. Georgia and all of us at ComputerCare are grateful to all our clients for your support this far in our journey. We hope to travel far with you into a better and fairer future.