Device Batteries: Fact of Fiction?

1

As mobile phones and other devices have gotten “smarter,” so have the batteries that power them. Everyone has heard the many different methods to best use and extend the life of your battery, but are those common battery tips truth or fiction? Let’s look at some.

You should charge your device to 100% before using it.

This used to be true, back when nickel-based batteries were widely used in mobile devices. Those batteries, while good for many other things, were a little dumb — if not fully charged, they would forget their own capacity and retain a “memory” of how they were charged, which would lead to loss of capacity if not re-calibrated. Now that lithium-ion batteries are widely used, that is no longer true. Li-ion batteries don’t have “memory” and can be used right out of the box without being charged first.

Run your battery down to 0% before charging.

According to BatteryUniversity.com, running your battery down to 0% and then charging back up to 100% puts a lot of stress on a battery, causing it to degrade faster. Keeping your battery between 40% and 85% (and not letting it go below 20%) with frequent, partial charges is the best charging routine to prolong the life of a li-ion battery. However, letting the battery run down to 0% occasionally (once a month, for example) helps the battery to re-calibrate itself and assess its own capacity, giving you a better idea of its true health.

Leaving a phone plugged in at 100% will overload the battery.

Like we said before, batteries are smarter than they used to be, and know when to stop charging themselves. However, keeping a battery at full charge for prolonged periods of time does degrade the life of a Li-ion battery faster than letting the battery cycle.

Don’t use your phone while it’s charging.

There are varying opinions on this question. While it will cause your phone or device to charge slower, some manufacturers don’t advise against using devices while they are charging. Some sources, however, suggest that using a device while charging puts more stress on the battery, causing its capacity and life to degrade. Anything that causes a device’s battery to heat will have an adverse affect on battery life span, since batteries tend to be like Goldilocks — they don’t like environments that are too hot or too cold. If a temperature is uncomfortable for you, it’s probably bad for your battery.

Extend battery life by closing your open apps.

This, it turns out, is not only not true, but is actually worse for your battery, according to both Apple’s SVP of Software and Android’s VP of Engineering. By closing all your open apps, you’re defeating the purpose of the built-in multitasking function of your device. There are several states of activity an app can fall under. Letting the multitasking functions run the state of those apps is the most efficient way to manage both battery and memory on a device. Closing out of all your apps all the time not only slows your phone, it also uses more memory and battery when it has to boot apps from scratch every time.

If you are worried about the life and capacity of your battery, here are some things to remember:

  • Batteries degrade no matter what you do. They have lifecycles, and eventually, they will not perform the way they once did. If you plan on keeping up with the latest releases of your particular device (every two years, for example), leaning on the built-in energy saving functions of your operating system (and avoiding some of the bad habits above) is probably enough to keep your battery healthy.
  • If you’re worried about getting the most out of your battery, the two biggest battery sucks are display and transmission. Lowering your screen brightness and utilizing airplane mode when service is spotty can save battery life.
  • Not every battery is perfect. Sometimes, devices may ship with a faulty battery. Check your warranty if you think this may be the case.
  • Software and apps can sometimes cause issues with battery life management. Luckily, these are usually caught quickly and fixed with updates. Keep your device and apps up-to-date as best you can.

If your battery isn’t like it used to be, and you don’t plan on upgrading your device, there is the option of replacing it. We can handle battery replacement and other hardware repairs, should you need them. Check out our available services to learn more.

How to Do Your Own Computer Repairs

1

We know folks would rather not see us, and that’s okay. You only come to a computer repair shop when something is super broken. We get that. That’s why we try to make sure when you do have to come to us, you get absolutely the best service possible. If we can, we’ll get your repairs covered by the warranty so they are free to you. If it’s not covered, we’re very upfront with our pricing and do our best to get things running smoothly for you again.

What if we could go a step further and help you not see us at all? Here’s a quick tutorial on how to be your own IT guy so you won’t have to see us again so soon. But know you will be missed. 🙂

Tip #1 – Turn it off, and turn it back on!

This really is the Holy Grail of IT fixes. It’s amazing how many things this cures. Like blowing on the cartridge or jiggling the handle, it’s an amazing panacea for a variety of technical glitches. Chances are, if you have a computer problem (not related to obvious physical damage, of course), every tech you’ll talk to is going to ask if you’ve turned it off and turned it back on yet.

Tip #2 – Update Everything!

If things are kind of working, but not really, or your system is slow, glitchy, or just doing weird things, it may be a software issue. The first step is to make sure everything is up to date. Go through and make sure everything is as updated as possible.

Tip #3 – GOOGLE it!

IT guys are good at fixing things, but there’s pretty much no way to know everything about every machine. So chances are, when you call a support line or chat with your IT guys at work, unless it’s something right down the middle of the plate, they’re Googling it. Why do you think doctors leave the examination room before giving you a diagnosis? Everyone looks up stuff, and you should, too. Problem is, many folks are kind of terrible at Googling a fix for their problem. So try this: Think of the question you would ask the IT guy, and type that question, exactly as you would say it, directly into Google. If it’s fixable, there’s a good chance your first result will show you the way.

If all else fails, bring it to us. Mechanics fix your car. Plumbers fix your pipes. This is what we do. We’ll make sure to get as much covered by your warranty as possible, so it’s free to you. And if it’s not covered, we’ll give you sound advice and straight forward pricing. Because we know you don’t want to come to us, but we’ll do everything we can to make you glad you did.

Tech Tip: Spring Cleaning Ideas for your Computer

1

Spring has officially sprung! This means many of us have already embarked on our spring cleaning rituals. Whether you’re deep cleaning the kitchen, clearing out the garage, or simply washing a few windows, a spring cleaning is an effective way to both freshen up your environment and declutter the mind. But why stop there? The tech you use in your daily life could also use a little cleaning love.

Tidying up your hardware and performing routine maintenance on your hard drive can boost your computer’s performance and increase its lifespan. Here are a few ideas of things you can do at home to properly clean your hardware and help clear out your digital junk this springtime:

Hardware Cleaning Tips

  • Responsibly recycle/donate old and unused devices
  • Inspect/clean I/O ports with a soft small brush or canned air to prevent dust and debris build up
  • Carefully dust internal components of your computer
  • Use cloth to wipe smudges off computer screen
  • Clean/disinfect keyboard and mouse
  • And of course, take broken hardware in for repair

Hard Drive Maintenance Tips

  • Delete old and duplicate files
  • Remove unwanted/unnecessary programs
  • Install software updates
  • Back up important documents, photos and videos to an external hard drive
  • Use cloud storage to maintain your important files
  • Run hardware maintenance scans on your SSD/hard drive to determine health
  • Speed up your hard drive by defragmenting once a month

Want to learn more? Keep an eye on the ComputerCare blog for more tech tips, subscribe to our email newsletter to receive helpful device advice directly to your inbox, drop by one of our Bay Area or Seattle locations, or get in touch with us via our contact page.

We’re dedicated to providing world-class service and repair, and ComputerCare’s expert staff is always happy to help our customers take good care of their hardware.

Tech Tip: Upgrading Your iPhone? Do This First.

1

It’s that time of year again when many of us are thinking about upgrading to a new Apple iPhone. If you’re one of those people, there are a few important steps you should take to protect your identity before selling it or giving it to someone in your family.

An old iPhone can be a treasure trove of personal information, not least of which can include personal and work email, access to your subscription services and cloud storage, your photos and apps. Your phone was probably also paired to numerous headphones, car audio systems and a variety of smart watches and other devices throughout your home or office. So, before you sell or give away an iPhone, it’s really important to erase any information about you that you wouldn’t want others to have.

If you use iCloud, like many iPhone and iPad users do, one important thing to remember when deleting data from your device is that you should not manually delete contacts, documents, photos, or any other iCloud information while you’re signed in with your Apple ID. This permanently deletes your content from the iCloud servers and any of your devices signed in to iCloud.

According to an Apple support page, here are the steps you should follow. We’ve included links back to additional support pages for reference:

 

If you still have your iPhone:

  1. If an Apple Watch is paired to your iPhone, first unpair your Apple Watch.
  2. Choose an appropriate method to back up your device using iTunes or iCloud.
  3. Sign out of iCloud, iTunes and App Store.
    • If your iPhone is using iOS 10.3 or later, tap Settings > [your name]. Scroll down and tap Sign Enter your Apple ID password and tap Turn Off.
    • If you’re using iOS 10.2 or earlier, tap Settings > iCloud > Sign Out. Tap Sign Out again, then tap Delete from My [device] and enter your Apple ID password. Then go to Settings > iTunes & App Store > Apple ID > Sign Out.
  4. Return to Settings and tap General > Reset > Erase All Content and Settings. If Find My iPhone is activated, you may need to enter your Apple ID and password.
  5. If asked for your device passcode or Restrictions passcode, enter it. Then tap Erase [device].
  6. If you’re switching to a non-Apple phone, you should deregister iMessage.
  7. If you have additional questions, you may need to contact your carrier for help transferring service to a new owner.

 

If you no longer have your iPhone

If you didn’t complete the steps above, and you no longer have your device, you should try the following:

  1. If had been using iCloud and Find My iPhone on the iPhone, sign in to iCloud.com or the Find My iPhone app on another device, select the iPhone to be deleted, and click Erase. After the iPhone has been erased, click Remove from Account.
  2. If you can’t follow either of the above steps, you should change your Apple ID password. This won’t remove personal information that’s stored on your old device, but it prevents the new owner from accessing or deleting content from your iCloud account.
  3. If you’re switching to a non-Apple phone, you should deregister iMessage.
  4. If you used Apple Pay with your old iPhone, you can remove your credit or debit cards at iCloud.com. Choose Settings and find which of your devices use Apple Pay, and click the device. Next to Apple Pay, click Remove.

We hope you get many years of use and enjoyment out of your iPhone. And don’t forget, if you’re in the Santa Clara or Seattle areas, ComputerCare handles warranty and non-warranty repairs on all Apple products, including battery replacement, screen repairs and much, much more. Go to our iPhone repair page for more information, and to submit a ticket.